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Breaking News LIVE from D.C. 2/27/18

Breaking News LIVE from D.C.!

Greg Liposky with Representative Kevin Brady (TX), Chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee, after a successful private lunch discussion on proposed Health Care Legislative changes. Tuesday, February 27th, 2018 – Washington D.C.        
Last week marked my 10th annual visit to participate in the National Association of Health Underwriters (NAHU) Capitol Conference in Washington D.C.  This is a VERY important symposium collaborating and working with our Congressional Delegates to help develop exceptional health care solutions.  NAHU members had another productive year in making significant progress during this very ambitious four day schedule!
Below are the top five focal points we presented in our Congressional meetings that addressed viable solutions to help solve our national health care crisis.
  1. Preserving the employer tax exclusion (deductibility) for health care benefits provided to employees.
  2. Eliminate the excessive employer reporting requirements under the ACA laws especially now that the individual mandate has been repealed in the new tax reform bill.
  3. Increase flexibility for HSA plans to allow for several diagnostic Dr. visits (without having to meet plan deductible first) and allow funding to HSA accounts to equal the total out of pocket exposure for all HSA plan designs.
  4. Create high risk reinsurance pools managed by each state to take care of the high/catastrophic cost claimants (.5% of population) and significantly reduce premium costs for a majority of the insured population.
  5. Permanently repealing the Health Insurance Tax and Cadillac Excise Tax.
Additional agenda items included significant Medicare improvements/modifications and market stabilization recommendations to reduce costs and improve individual and employer market risk pools.
To review both our current and past legislative successes that will ultimately help deliver high quality of care, and cost reduction solutions to all Americans, click here.
Respectfully,
Greg Liposky

Final Regulations Released on the 90-day Waiting Period Limit

money-bag-filled-with-money •      On Feb. 20, 2014, the Departments issued two rules on the 90-day waiting period limit. •      The rules apply for plan years beginning on or after Jan. 1, 2015. •      A one-month orientation period is a permitted eligibility condition. •      Rehired employees may be required to satisfy the waiting period again. For plan years beginning on or after Jan. 1, 2014, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) prohibits group health plans and group health insurance issuers from applying any waiting period that exceeds 90 days. On Feb. 20, 2014, the Departments of Labor (DOL), Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Treasury (the Departments) released final regulations on the 90-day waiting period limit. These regulations generally finalize provisions in proposed regulations issued in March 2013, with minimal changes. At the same time, the Departments released a separate proposed rule regarding a new provision permitting orientation periods under the 90-day waiting period limit. The final regulations apply for plan years beginning on or after Jan. 1, 2015. For plan years beginning in 2014, the Departments will consider compliance with either the 2013 proposed regulations or the final regulations to constitute compliance with the 90-day waiting period limit requirement. FULL ARTICLE HERE

Employer Mandate Delayed Until 2016 for Medium-Sized Employers

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) imposes a penalty on large employers that do not offer minimum essential coverage to full-time employees and their dependents. Large employers that offer this coverage may still be liable for a penalty if the coverage is unaffordable or does not provide minimum value. The ACA’s employer mandate provision is often referred to as the “employer shared responsibility” or “pay or play” rules. On Feb. 12, 2014, the U.S. Treasury Department published final regulations implementing the employer shared responsibility provisions of the ACA. The regulations took effect on Feb. 12, 2014. Under the final regulations, applicable large employers that have fewer than 100 full-time employees generally will have an additional year, until 2016, to comply with the pay or play rules. Large employers with 100 or more full-time employees must comply with the pay or play rules starting in 2015.   CLICK HERE TO READ FULL ARTICLE